Often asked: How Can You Tell Difference Between Marble And Cultured Marble?

How can I tell what kind of marble I have?

If you see scratches or signs of wear on the surface of your stone, you are looking at real marble. If you scratch a knife across an inconspicuous area or on the underside of the slab and it shows little or no damage, you are looking at the more durable granite or manufactured stone.

How can you tell real marble from fake?

If you have access to the bottom of the surface, look through the magnifying glass for little holes, or dents. Fake marble will show little holes where pockets of air popped from the mixing of plastic resin. Real marble will have natural dents from where it originally came from.

What does cultured marble look like?

Cultured Marble comes in many colors, but it primarily seen in white with veins of varying colors. Cultured Marble is a blanket term for manufactured marble, granite, and onyx. It gives a sophisticated, classic look to a room. Colors range from whites and greys to natural stone looks and everything in between.

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Does cultured marble yellow?

Cultured Marble Yellowing Older cultured marble needs air to breathe. According to Elite Countertops, newer cultured marble surfaces are composed of materials that inhibit the chemical reaction caused by the sun penetrating the surface and causing the yellow tint. Old water buildup also can cause yellowing.

What is the most popular marble?

Carrara marble is the most common marble type, which is why it is also the least expensive marble on this list.

What is the most expensive marble?

The White Statuario marble of Carrara is one of the most precious marbles in the world. Few materials, in fact, can compete with its transparent sheen and its incredibly compact structure.

Is cultured marble outdated?

Cultured marble is a man-made material used for countertops, vanity tops, sinks, backsplashes, bathtubs, shower walls and pans that were extremely popular in homes built from the 1960s into the 1980s but is still widely used today, particularly in new home construction. Cultured marble is faux marble.

What will clean marble?

There are special marble cleaning solutions out there, but regular dish soap works well. You can mix a little soap into warm water in a spray bottle or simply put a few drops onto a wet cloth. Wipe the marble surface down with this sudsy cloth and follow immediately with a rinse and a dry.

What looks like marble but is more durable?

Quartzite. Quartzite is a natural stone with a look similar to marble, but the durability of granite. It is highly resistant to heat and stains and will not etch when exposed to water and acid like marble does.

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How long does cultured marble last?

Cultured marble is an excellent choice if you want the look of expensive marble without the cost. However, be sure to recognize the limitations of imitation stone. With proper treatment, your cultured marble countertop should last you approximately 20 years.

How do you maintain cultured marble?

Gloss and Suede Finish, The beauty of cultured marble/granite is the ease of cleaning and maintaining the new shiny look. To clean, just wipe with a soft cloth or sponge using a mild soap and water or a non-abrasive foam cleaner. To maintain your marble/granite luster, periodically apply a protective coat of wax.

Is cultured marble cheaper than quartz?

Cost: Quartz vs. Cultured Marble. On average, the cost of quartz countertops is significantly more than cultured marble. Quartz countertops costs go from $45 to $125 per square foot installed.

How do you whiten yellowed cultured marble?

Steps to clean yellowed cultured marble:

  1. ´╗┐Mix a very dilute bleach solution (1 capful of bleach added to a 32 oz. / quart spray bottle full of water).
  2. Allow the dilute bleach solution to dwell on the surface for 5 minutes.
  3. Scrub gently with a non-abrasive pad.
  4. Rinse thoroughly with clean water.

Why is my white marble turning yellow?

The most common culprit for white marble turning yellow is iron, which can be found in many natural stones. When exposed to water, acids or bleach, the iron in the stone will begin to oxidize and turn it yellow.

Will bleach hurt cultured marble?

Harsh chemicals like bleach and abrasive cleaners can damage the coating on your cultured marble, making it appear dull and causing chemical scuffs. You should also avoid cleaning with white vinegar, as the acid can cause it to pit and lose shine.

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